3 reasons education needs an LRS

Education needs an LRS. Here are three reasons why

We have a very rudimentary understanding of how our students and teachers actually learn.

We can’t tell how and when they are learning or what their preferred learning style is. We can barely even see our learners data without (practically) begging for it.

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Why have a Learning Record Store?

You know what a Learning Record Store is but why do you need one?

learning record store

That’s a quote from an outstanding blog post by the good people over at Learning Locker where they explain why a company or organization would need a Learning Record Store (LRS).

It’s a broad and basic quote for sure but, in our minds, is extremely applicable within the context of education.

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Thrivist and the Learning Record Store

Why Thrivist exists and how the Learning Record Store supports our mission

Today’s education market demands technology that is easy-to-use, intuitive, adapts to an individual’s learning style and creates actionable insights from the data collected.

Adaptive learning and actionable insights from data, we feel, are what is currently missing in education solutions today. There isn’t anyone in K-12 education working to solve those two problems.

Thrivist exists to solve those two problems.

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How will ESSA impact schools in your state?

We know that with the new education law in place states will now have increased control on how their education systems are constructed. But how will that part of ESSA impact schools?

Perhaps there will not be a more obvious outcome of ESSA than how states deal with their classroom teachers.

In the past the federal government was able to dictate the terms of teacher evaluations on a national scale. Many teachers feel that his is a good thing (we agree, by the way) because states will obviously be more in tune with what is happening in local districts and communities and will take those into account when evaluating their teachers.

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ESSA & UDL sittin’ in a tree

For the first time, federal education law addresses Universal Design for Learning

In passing ESSA, UDL (Universal Design for Learning) was addressed in federal law for the first time in our country’s history.

(Spoiler: UDL essentially means providing content that is accessible and conducive to multiple learning styles and that reduces barriers for all students, including students with disabilities.)

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Opportunities and the (one big) risk of ESSA

The new law presents a lot of good opportunities and poses a risk for education. ESSA explained.

We’ve now well established a few things about the new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act. States and local districts now have more control over things like standards, school ratings and testing time. (Good). The law still has holes in it that low-income and special education students could fall through, just like No Child Left Behind. (Bad).

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ESSA Summary: 3 Things To Know

 

If you’re curious about the new education act, allow us to present our brief ESSA summary.

You can also watch this great video by The 74 Million too.

Here are 3 things you need to know:

ESSA (1)

    1. Control: It shifts power and responsibility for school quality away from Washington and gives it back to the states.
    2. Testing: While standardized testing is still required the states will now decide what is required of their schools for the ratings.
    3. Curriculum: ESSA prohibits the federal government from implementing mandated curriculum (i.e. Common Core)

The main theme here is we’ve taken power away from Washington and given it back to the individual states.

What seems to have some educators very happy is takeaway #2 – the reduced emphasis on standardized testing.

Under No Child Left Behind educators felt the need to teach their students to the test and in the same vein, their students were “tested to death”.

Now, even though schools are required to test up to 95% of their eligible students the states decide how much testing is required. There is the possibility that a state could use a test like the SAT or ACT to replace other state tests.

ESSA also establishes a pilot program for seven states (to be determined) to rethink and reinvent their assessment system. Should this go well then we could see the way we go about assessing our students completely reimagined.

If you want more info about ESSA download our infographic that goes a bit deeper.

What teachers think about ESSA

Our teachers will be most heavily impacted by the new education law so, what do teachers think about ESSA?

With the passing of ESSA, all of us in education expect changes big and small when the new law goes into effect for the 2017-18 school year.

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When Educators Become Students

What happens when educators become students?

In one of our recent blog posts, we compared learning in the classroom to a visit to the doctor’s office (Prescription for Learning) recognizing that we all come to either place with our own needs that are unique to each of us. Continuing that train of thought, I would like to discuss what it might look like if schools became more personalized. I hope by sharing ideas, a conversation might evolve that helps us all move forward on this personalized learning journey.

Let’s begin with the learning environment and the antiquated practice of seat time to determine school funding and student grade progression. By now, I would venture to say that most educators know that seat time has nothing to do with learning and is an outdated practice considering the technology and resources available to us today.

Acknowledging this issue is not where the problem lies.

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